Corie Farnsley

Owner and Creative Director

In the mid-1980s, on hot, summer afternoons on vacation in Sarasota, Fla., I vividly remember writing stories about fictional characters in a composition book while my grandmother babysat my sister and me.

The stories were terrible.

By the time I was in high school, I had found a way of writing that I could do well — writing for the school newspaper — and a direction for my future career began to take shape. I was going to write for a newspaper, maybe a magazine, and I knew that I would love it.

My aunt worked for a large newspaper in Florida (she still does), and she gave me a tour of the newsroom. The energy in the room was intoxicating. I knew I had found my destiny.

I was wrong.

I loved my college days in journalism school, but my career path took a surprising turn while I was there. While I loved to write, I also discovered that my simmering desire to learn more about photography was about to burst into flames.

And as I began to improve the desktop publishing skills I had picked up as a designer in the high school newsroom, I fell in love with graphic design.

I enrolled in public relations courses, and I loved those, too. As I was learning that PR was not about being spin artists but building and nurturing relationships with the people who are close to your work (are you surprised, too?), I took an internship with the community relations department at St. Francis Hospital & Health Centers (now called Franciscan Health).

Voila! I found the sweet spot where all of my professional loves — writing, graphic design, photography and public relations — crossed with my personal desire to do something that matters in the world.

Now I had finally found my true professional destiny.

Family-Work Balance: The Struggle is Real

My community relations internship led to a full-time community relations specialist position at St. Francis. It was an amazing job that I loved with all of my heart.

But while I was working there, I had my first child and realized I did not want to spend so many of my waking hours away from my home and family. So I sought a part-time professional job. They were few and far between.

I landed a job as communications director at the Indianapolis Parks Foundation, and I loved the schedule (Tuesday through Thursday). But city politics is not my cup of tea, and I am not comfortable asking people, face-to-face, for thousands of dollars, so I discovered that the perfect schedule doesn't necessarily equate to the perfect job.

With no part-time professional positions to be found, I went back to full-time work at Christ Church Cathedral. I loved my job as communications director, but I did not love the schedule. Many weeks I was working six days, and I had 10 to 12 hours of commuting time each week.

With now two young children at home, I knew that was for the birds. My heart longed to be able to spend more time enjoying my kids while they were young, and yet I still wanted to maintain a professional career.

If it's broken, fix it yourself.

It seemed the best solution to the problem of the scarcity of part-time professional communications jobs was just to create one myself.

I began freelancing in January 2007, and I have been blessed through my work every day since.

When it was time to grow my business, I knew I wanted to provide that professional, part-time opportunity for women and men like me, who desired to spend less time at work and more time enjoying their families.

I also wanted our work to matter to the world. I had never really desired to spend my entire career simply focusing on beefing up someone else's bottom line. There was too much need for good in the world to be satisfied not helping in some way.

Over time, CorComm Creative has become an avenue for supporting all of the things that are important to me — and important to other members of our team, as well. We're all working professionals who care about families — our own and those in our communities. We care about balancing our own work and family lives, and we're passionate about the creative work we do.

We focus on nonprofit organizations who are change-makers in the world in which we live. We want to walk alongside you and contribute, in some small way, to the work you are doing, the change you are making on a daily basis. And we want you to succeed.

That is the heart of CorComm Creative.

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4 W. MAIN ST.     DANVILLE, IN 46122     (317) 946-6640

All content is © CorComm Creative. All rights reserved.

In the mid-1980s, on hot, summer afternoons on vacation in Sarasota, Fla., I vividly remember writing stories about fictional characters in a composition book while my grandmother babysat my sister and me.

4 W. MAIN ST.     DANVILLE, IN 46122     (317) 946-6640

All content is © CorComm Creative. All rights reserved.

4 W. MAIN ST.    DANVILLE, IN 46122
(317) 946-6640

All content is © CorComm Creative. All rights reserved.

CorComm Creative     4 W. Main St.    Danville, IN 46122     (317) 946-6640

All content is © CorComm Creative. All rights reserved.

4 W. Main St.    Danville, IN 46122     (317) 946-6640

All content is © CorComm Creative. All rights reserved.

4 W. Main St.    Danville, IN 46122

(317) 946-6640

All content is © CorComm Creative.

All rights reserved.